Print Gallery
Women Carrying Firewood

Women Carrying Firewood

 13 x 9½” Lithograph Print on acid free paper

 Signed & Numbered Limited Edition of 200

 ©1996 Djibril N’Doye


Gathering wood for fires for traditional cooking is part of the work of many women 

in regions of Senegal where agriculture and fishing are the primary economic activities. Sometimes women must walk several miles to reach an area where firewood can be gathered, then carried home and stored.  Women usually walk in groups.  Often when I was walking home from my field, I would see one of these small groups and, out of respect, offer to help carry their load as far as they were traveling.

Women Carrying Firewood
$60.00
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Women at the Well

Women at the Well

13 x 9½” Lithograph Print on acid free paper

Signed & Numbered Limited Edition of 200

©1996 Djibril N’Doye


Although educational efforts have been made around the world to improve the inequality between man and woman, much remains to be done. Almost all roots of education are supported by the mother; she carries her infant through pregnancy and then on her back until the child is able to walk. With her unlimited affection and respect for life in society, the mother continues to guide and teach her child until maturity.

Women at the Well
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The Hospital

The Hospital

11 7/8 x 8 7/8” Lithograph Print on acid free Paper

Signed & Numbered Limited Edition of 200

©1989 Djibril N’Doye


While waiting in a hospital hallway with a friend who needed care, I was struck by the indifference and roughness with which a hospital employee was handling a pregnant woman in a wheelchair.  I feel that a healthcare worker should be concerned with compassionate attendance to a patient and contribute to a comfortable healing atmosphere rather than thinking only about receiving a paycheck. The image serves as a reminder to be kind every day when we are dealing with others.


The Hospital
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The Balafon Player (Le jouer du balafon)

The Balafon Player (Le jouer du balafon)

 13 3/8 x 10” Lithograph Print on acid free paper

 Signed & Numbered Limited Edition of 200

 ©1995 Djibril N’Doye


A musician plays a traditional percussion instrument called the “balafon”. He uses two wood sticks with rubber tips to strike the wooden slats lashed across small hollow gourds called calabash, inverted under the frame. The calabash creates resonance. The echo of his melody bounces off the wall behind him. Balafons are an integral part of many musical groups in West Africa.


The Balafon Player (Le jouer du balafon)
$60.00
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Taking Root and Blossoming

Taking Root and Blossoming

  13 x 9¾” Lithographic Print (4-color offset) on acid free paper

  Signed and Numbered Limited Edition of 500

  ©1995 Djibril N’Doye


A teacher imparts to the new generation lessons about life and correctness. Many of the young generation listen with respect, but sometimes there are those who do not. They look down or away from the sharing of wisdom. The top of the stick the teacher holds symbolizes openness. It is very important to be open, especially to the things we can learn from our elders.


Taking Root and Blossoming
$60.00
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Sabar Dance

Sabar Dance

 13 x 9½” Lithograph Print on acid free paper

 Signed & Numbered Limited Edition of 200

 ©1996 Djibril N’Doye


The “sabar” drum is one of three main drum types used widely in Senegal. Less known outside the region than the wider shorter hand drum, the sabar is worn around the waist of the drummer and played with one hand and a stick. It is long and narrow and therefore produces more of a bass sound. Special choreography is designed exclusively for dancing to the sabar.



Sabar Dance
$60.00
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Létou (Braiding Hair)

Létou (Braiding Hair)

 13 x 9½” Lithograph Print on acid free paper

 Signed & Numbered Limited Edition of 200

 ©1996 Djibril N’Doye


The word in Wolof for braiding hair is “létou”. These two women take turns braiding each other’s hair in preparation for attending a festive event such as a baptism. They are friends and do not charge each other for their work. It is common to see friends working so skillfully together especially to prepare for a party, or to prepare for traveling. (One university-published dictionary of Wolof has twenty-three different verb entries for variations of ‘braiding’.)

Létou (Braiding Hair)
$60.00
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La maîtrise (Accomplished Woman Dancing)

La maîtrise (Accomplished Woman Dancing)

11 7/8 x 8 7/8” Lithograph Print on acid free Paper

Signed & Numbered Limited Edition of 200

©1989 Djibril N’Doye


In honor of all women who are at their best while dancing, I created this dancer at the peak of her power.  She is in her element.  Her left arm is out to her side; her right hand is on her back.  The bracelets on her left arm slide up and down in time with her movement and add to the percussive element of her dance.  Her earrings also move in time with her rhythm.

La maîtrise (Accomplished Woman Dancing)
$60.00
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Firêkou (Unbraiding)

Firêkou (Unbraiding)

 

13¼ x 10” Lithograph Print on acid free Paper

 Signed & Numbered Limited Edition of 200

 ©1995 Djibril N’Doye


In an attempt to stay current with hairstyles, this woman is taking out her curls in order to replace them with different ones. The word in the Wolof language for this action is “firêkou”. Each curl is unwound and drops to the floor in this process. After household chores are complete, women enjoy spending free time trying new styles or getting ready for a party.

Firêkou (Unbraiding)
$60.00
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Acoustic Choreography - Large

Acoustic Choreography

  29 x 20”, Digital Print on Archival Paper

  Signed & Numbered Limited Edition Print of 200

  ©2003 Djibril N’Doye


In Africa, percussive strands of beads represent a lot in dance, as much as earrings and bracelets. Dancing is a form of expression and the acoustics (of the beads, bracelets, anklets, and earrings) are a vital and cherished part of the music.


Acoustic Choreography - Large
$600.00
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Le Paysan au Repos (The Peasant at Rest)

Le paysan au repos (The Peasant at Rest)

  19 x 14”, Digital Print on archival paper 

  Signed & Numbered Limited Edition of 250

  ©2001 Djibril N’Doye

A very short rest! In the area where I grew up, I worked along with my family in traditional agriculture which involved intense physical labor. My father made sure that his children were educated in farming so that they would already know a lot about it by the age of six.

In that environment, a long rest is almost nonexistent. Resting too long depletes the body’s energy and makes one lazy to resume working. It is most important for the peasant to set a good example for his children how to develop endurance and to understand how rewarding it is to have a good harvest. That makes it worth all the hard work - especially for the peasant’s family to keep motivated to defend their honor and maintain their well bein

Le Paysan au Repos (The Peasant at Rest)
$250.00
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Breath Harmony

Breath Harmony

 26 x 19” Digital Print on archival paper

 Signed & Numbered Limited Edition Print of 50

 ©2001 Djibril N’Doye


Throughout my life, my grandfather taught me much about many things and gave me great wisdom and guidance. I always reflected on, and found comfort in, my grandfather’s words. 

There are things in life that we cannot change; that are, in fact, a part of living.

One day, after having lived in the United States for several years, I called my family in Senegal as I often did, but this time I was uncustomarily given bad news over the phone: my beloved grandfather had passed away. Because I found out so long after the fact that my grandfather passed on, I was unable to attend any of the traditional memorial ceremonies that were held for him.

This drawing is my expression of both sorrow and grieving for the earthly loss of my grandfather, particularly in my absence, and the most prayerful, harmonious accompaniment to the afterlife.

Breath Harmony
$600.00
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Champ de mil (The Millet Field)

Champ de mil (The Millet Field)

 19 x 26” Digital Print on archival paper

 Signed & Numbered Limited Edition Print of 50

 ©2000 Djibril N’Doye


Traditional agriculture is very familiar to me. My family raised and educated me in the practice of growing millet. This drawing shows the anatomy of the fully-grown millet field ready to be harvested. The visibility of the grain together with the rigid stalks is a testimony to the result of attention paid to the long-term effort of growing the crop.

Champ de mil (The Millet Field)
$600.00
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Danse a la Calebasse (Dancing with Calabash)

Danse à la calebasse (Dancing with Calabash)

  28½ x 20” Digital Print on Archival Paper

  Signed & Numbered Limited Edition Print of 150

  ©2001 Djibril N’Doye


There are many forms of expression in the areas of music and dance. All societies 

have their own style(s). Music and dance play a very positive role in life in any given society, particularly contributing to the health and well-being of each individual.

I grew up in an environment where music is an integral part of everyday life. 

There is no separate ‘school’ for dance; everyone is exposed to the joy of rhythmic movement 

and encouraged to participate.

While dancing, these three women play percussive instruments made with gourds and 

decorated with beads and/or cowrie shells that resonate against the outside of the calabash.

Danse a la Calebasse (Dancing with Calabash)
$600.00
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Acoustic Choreography - Small

Acoustic Choreography

 14½ x 10”, Digital Print on Archival Paper
 Signed & Numbered Limited Edition Print of 350

 ©2003 Djibril N’Doye

In Africa, percussive strands of beads represent a lot in dance, as much as earrings and bracelets do. Dancing is a form of expression and the acoustics (of the beads, bracelets, anklets, and earrings) are a vital and cherished part of the music.

Acoustic Choreography - Small
$100.00
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Balafon Beats
Balafon Beats
20 x 14” Digital Print on archival Paper
Signed/Numbered Limited Edition Print of 50
©2013 Djibril N’Doye

The Balafon musical instrument is known from the Mandinka (Mandingue)
Empire as invented by Soumangourou Kanté, the king of Sosso of Mali, who himself played it
in his private room to boost his spirit before going to battle - and only he played it. The
balafon was not known in 1350 as an instrument. But music has no border and is a universal
language. The balafon is now one of the most well-known instruments in traditional West
African music, along with the kora, the drum, and other handmade instruments.
The chambers of resonance are composed of many hollowed gourds of
different diameters, placed below the wooden slats. The balafon is known as the blacksmith's
instrument. The motion in playing it shows the balafon as the anvil and the sticks with rubber
tips at the end, as the hammer. Most movements can be identified as when the blacksmith is
working.
Balafon Beats
$250.00
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Diaykatou Ferr (Stringing Bead) - Small
Diaykatou Ferr [Stringing Beads]
11½ x 8”, Digital Print on Archival Paper
Signed Open Edition Print
©2007 Djibril N’Doye

Although she wears the strands around her neck, they serve as the display of her
merchandise available for sale. She is a street merchant making a day-to-day living.
She strings colored glass beads in lengths to be worn around a woman’s waist. Women wear
several strings of mid-sized beads around their waist - but under their clothing. This generally adds
to a woman’s mystique since one cannot see the beads but can easily hear them when she dances.
Diaykatou Ferr (Stringing Bead) - Small
Diaykatou Ferr (Stringing Bead) - Large
Diaykatou Ferr [Stringing Beads]
28 1/2 x 19 5/8”, Digital Print on Archival Paper
Signed Open Edition Print
©2007 Djibril N’Doye

Although she wears the strands around her neck, they serve as the display of her
merchandise available for sale. She is a street merchant making a day-to-day living.
She strings colored glass beads in lengths to be worn around a woman’s waist. Women wear
several strings of mid-sized beads around their waist - but under their clothing. This generally adds
to a woman’s mystique since one cannot see the beads but can easily hear them when she dances.
Diaykatou Ferr (Stringing Bead) - Large
$600.00
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Disparity
Disparity
19 x 28 ½”, Digital print on Archival Ppaper
Signed & Numbered Limited Edition of 40
2016 Djibril N’Doye
In farming life, disparity from one family to another is often a short term situation. Every farmer
depends on the rain season. Like in any society, stratification by class is not natural in society. It is created by
humans. A good harvest feeds a family until the next harvest and sometimes longer than that.
With one rainy season yearly starting every July, rain is life to farmers. Natural disasters like flooding,
drought, locust, or sickness can cause a lack of a good harvest for granaries. With a communal spirit in a
communal community, farmers who have a good and abundant harvest gather behind closed doors and decide
to fill the granaries of those less fortunate.
Another year, the same situation may happen to the ones who are helping this year, and the ones who
received the help will decide to fill the granaries of those who are not fortunate. It is human nature to feel up or
down and also hard to be up all the time.
Here in the drawing called “Disparity”, the ones who have and the ones who don’t have are hard to find
because there are no faces visible. While helping each other, what another can see is the beauty of
togetherness, the beauty of the communal bond. How one feels or looks is part of his/her private life, and life
goes on . . .
In today’s life in my community and many others around the world, “modernism”, elitism, politics,
religious sectarian rivalry, and technology are pushing society to modernize, and the landscape I grew up seeing
is being taken over by the industry hiring farmers, while traditional farming with organic crops is disappearing,
the communal living is also being lost and individualism is taking its place.
From my own first hand observation, 8 out 10 people in my hometown have a cell phone most of the
time hanging on their side from a belt of the young men for a ‘visual aesthetic’ but not everyone has been able
to pay for minutes to place a call, they wait to be called. Cellular phones are like ants in Africa.
The ecosystem is suffering from erosion and industrial pollution like nature is at the mercy of “political
modernism”. It is unpleasant for me to see degradation in a very rich and historic indigenous village like my
hometown which is now a town of 75,000 people demographically.
My hometown is Bargny, one of the oldest and the most historic indigenous places, and I call it home.
If Bargny is changing, every place will also be changing or already has.
Disparity
$600.00
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Drum Beat and Spiritual Absorption
Drum Beat and Spiritual Absorption
20 x 14”, Giclée Print on Archival Paper
Signed & Numbered Limited Edition Print of 100
©2012 Djibril N’Doye
In one of the drumming classes, I was teaching, one of my students particularly caught
my attention. In the middle of the drumming, I noticed she stopped beating her drum while
the drumming was still going on. She began to shake her arms up and down, right and left,
her eyes closed, absorbing everything coming from the drums connecting with the depth of
the spiritual sounds of the drums. After watching her many times, I got inspired by how she
became transformed with this spiritual joy that I wanted to capture in this drawing. I
symbolize the whole class with the drummer you see through her as the spirit.
Drum Beat and Spiritual Absorption
$250.00
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